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Cyan Structure

Cyan Structure

Brooch, 2014, wood, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, nickel silver, sterling.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Cyan Breastplate

Cyan Breastplate

Cyan Breastplate, necklace, wood, pvc, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, silver, 2014.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Six Degrees

Six Degrees

Brooch, 2011, wood, pvc, plexiglass, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk. (Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography exhibition and catalogue, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 2104)

    From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by May Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Root

Root

Root necklace, 2011, plastic, cyanotype on silk, wood, nickel silver, sterling, cotton, pvc  (Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography exhibition and catalogue, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 2104).

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by the photograms of Man Ray. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Cyan House

Cyan House

Neck piece, wood, brass, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, 2012.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms.. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Growth

Cyan Growth

Cyan Growth, necklace, 2012, wood, nickel, brass, silver, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man ray's phtograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  from my Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

    From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.  An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?   

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Chain

Cyan Chain

Brooch, 2010, plastic, paper, wood, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, pearls.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Many Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

 

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Pearls

Cyan Pearls

Brooch, 2010, wood, copper, plexiglass, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Ellipse

Cyan Ellipse

Brooch, 2010, nickel, plastic, shell, pearl, bone, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Square

Cyan Square

Brooch, 2010, wood, copper, plexiglass, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Continued Thread

Continued Thread

Brooch, 2011, wood, nickel, silver, 22k gold, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Pearls #2

Cyan Pearls #2

Brooch, 2012, wood, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, cotton.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Untitled

Untitled

Untitled brooch, found plastic, plexiglass, nickel silver, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Lock and Key

Cyan Lock and Key

Necklace, 2010, pvc, plexiglass, steel, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, cotton.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Necklace

Cyan Necklace

2010.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

 Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Ring

Cyan Ring

Ring, 2012,wood, silver, copper, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Installation view

Installation view

Cyan Silhouettes- Works By Anna Marvarotis and Thea Clark, Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014

Installation View

Installation View

"Cyan Silhouettes: Works by Anna Mavromatis and Thea Clark", Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014.

 

Cyan House, neckpiece

Installation View

Installation View

"Cyan Silhouettes; Works by Anna Mavromatis and Thea Clark", Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014

Cyan Structure

Brooch, 2014, wood, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, nickel silver, sterling.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Cyan Breastplate

Cyan Breastplate, necklace, wood, pvc, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, silver, 2014.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Six Degrees

Brooch, 2011, wood, pvc, plexiglass, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk. (Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography exhibition and catalogue, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 2104)

    From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by May Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Root

Root necklace, 2011, plastic, cyanotype on silk, wood, nickel silver, sterling, cotton, pvc  (Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography exhibition and catalogue, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 2104).

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by the photograms of Man Ray. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

 

Cyan House

Neck piece, wood, brass, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, 2012.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms.. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Growth

Cyan Growth, necklace, 2012, wood, nickel, brass, silver, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man ray's phtograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  from my Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Chain

Brooch, 2010, plastic, paper, wood, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, pearls.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Many Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

 

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Pearls

Brooch, 2010, wood, copper, plexiglass, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Ellipse

Brooch, 2010, nickel, plastic, shell, pearl, bone, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Square

Brooch, 2010, wood, copper, plexiglass, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Continued Thread

Brooch, 2011, wood, nickel, silver, 22k gold, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Pearls #2

Brooch, 2012, wood, nickel, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk, cotton.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Untitled

Untitled brooch, found plastic, plexiglass, nickel silver, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Lock and Key

Necklace, 2010, pvc, plexiglass, steel, cyanotype on silk, tinted plastic, cotton.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Necklace

2010.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

 Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Cyan Ring

Ring, 2012,wood, silver, copper, tinted plastic, cyanotype on silk.

   From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness, and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.

An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?

 

Installation view

Cyan Silhouettes- Works By Anna Marvarotis and Thea Clark, Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014

Installation View

"Cyan Silhouettes: Works by Anna Mavromatis and Thea Clark", Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014.

 

Cyan House, neckpiece

Installation View

"Cyan Silhouettes; Works by Anna Mavromatis and Thea Clark", Houston Center of Contemporary Craft, curated by Kathryn Hall, 2014

Cyan Structure
Cyan Breastplate
Six Degrees
Root
Cyan House
Cyan Growth
    From the series , "Fluidity and Form" (2010-2014), which uses photograms (objects placed directly on photosensitive material) and cyanotypes (transparencies placed on photosensitive material). The images are created to reference ideas of genderedness and are also inspired by Man Ray's photograms. Incorporating the abstract use of objects such as pearls or wood shavings, diagrams, and text, in order to relate them to their male or female associations. This is further emphasized by placing the blue images in pink framing.  An investigation into the nature of identity provided inspiration for the  Fluidity and Form series. These works evoke dualities: male and female, anima and animus, yin and yang, stasis and change. The cyanotype images can be seen as fragments of memory, abstracted elements of a changing narrative that add up to a notion of self. They were captured on silk using UV light and water and are rendered in the classic blue color of this early photographic process. Like dermis over muscle, the tinted pink plastic both obscures and unifies the structure underlying it. Alternatively, these pink plastic forms can be read in relation to time. Are they becoming?  Solidifying the ephemeral?  Or reversing the process, dissolving, and disintegrating?   
Cyan Chain
Cyan Pearls
Cyan Ellipse
Cyan Square
Continued Thread
Cyan Pearls #2
Untitled
Cyan Lock and Key
Cyan Necklace
Cyan Ring
Installation view
Installation View
Installation View